Last year at this time, I was in London to see my Dallas Cowboys play at Wembley Stadium.  Little did I know that for the 100 year anniversary of World War I, there were special plans at the Tower of London to make what is known as Remembrance or Armistice Day extra special.

Many Americans may not have heard about Remembrance or Armistice Day (November 11th).  In the US, we now call it Veteran’s Day.  November 11th marks the day the armistice (cease fire agreement) was signed between the World War I Allies and Germany.  In the US, the name changed to Veteran’s Day to expand the holiday to honor all military veterans.

Every year in the weeks leading up to November 11th, remembrance poppies are given out in return for a donation that goes to support the British Military.  It is a simple paper design, but very meaningful as they commemorate the sacrifices of the armed forces and show support for those currently serving.

Anisa with her Remembrance Poppy!
Anisa with her Remembrance Poppy!
Poppies, poppies, and more poppies - 888,246 to be exact.
Poppies, poppies, and more poppies – 888,246 to be exact.

So to mark the 100 year anniversary, 888,246 ceramic poppies (one for each British fatality during the war) were placed in the moat around the Tower of London.  The major art installation was called Blood Swept Lands and the Seas of Red and was created by artists Paul Cummins and Tom Piper.  Paul Cummins actually lost a finger making the poppies.  The scale of the installation was intended to reflect the magnitude of 100 year anniversary and create a powerful visual commemoration.  All of the ceramic poppies from the installation were sold, raising millions of pounds for charity.  I wish I could have bought one, but by the time I learned about it, they were already sold out.

The Tower of London surrounded by the poppies and lots of people!
The Tower of London surrounded by the poppies and lots of people!

So, I braved the crazy crowds to see the ceramic poppies and it really was worth it.  Seeing the sea of red was incredibly moving.  My favorite part of the installation was where poppies were coming out of one of the tower windows, almost like a trail of blood tears.  Since the poppies exhibit closed at the Tower of London, the “weeping window” section has been on tour (currently at St. George’s Hall in Liverpool, England until January 2016).

Another view of the Tower Poppies
Another view of the Tower Poppies

Even without the poppies, the Tower of London is worth a visit. The Tower is a complex of several buildings set within two layers of walls and a moat.  The White Tower, which is the center of the complex, was built by William the Conqueror in 1078! There were several phases of expansion, mainly under Kings Richard the Lionheart, Henry III, and Edward I in the twelve and thirteenth centuries.

The White Tower before the clouds rolled in.
The White Tower before the clouds rolled in.

The Tower of London was also a prison, mostly for prisoners accused of treason.  Elizabeth I was held here before she became Queen.  Her mother, Anne Boleyn, was imprisoned and later executed.  Twenty-two people were executed in the Tower while more than 200 executions took place nearby at Tower Hill.

It was interesting to see the area where prisoners were held.  There was graffiti on the walls that allegedly was done by some of the prisoners.  Especially during the Tudor period (16th century), many prisoners were mentally and physically tortured.  The main ways to torture people at the Tower were the rack and the manacles, which are on exhibit.  I also liked the view of the Tower Bridge from this area.  The Tower Bridge is just beautiful, almost seems like something out of a fairy tale, and definitely worth a visit itself, especially since they have a newly installed glass floor.

Anisa and the Tower Bridge
Anisa and the Tower Bridge

Being a fan of the royal family, my favorite part of the Tower of London is seeing the crown jewels.  The mystique and beauty of the diamonds and precious jewels in the collection draws large crowds.  You can see several different crowns (some which are still currently in use) and many other priceless items.   Several pieces on display are still used for coronations.  As you can imagine, there are armed guards protecting the jewels and they are changed every two hours.  There is not an elaborate ceremony to change the guards like there is at Buckingham Palace (also worth a visit).

Lastly, be sure to also see the armory exhibit inside the White Tower.  The White Tower is the oldest building in the Tower of London, so it dates back more than 900 years.  Inside you can see an impressive exhibit of the armor for many the past kings (Henry VIII, Charles I and James II) and even their horses.  You can also see the Chapel Royal of St. John.

Anisa and a Beefeater at the Tower of London
Anisa and a Beefeater at the Tower of London

There is so much history in this place, definitely more than I can cover in this blog.  If you are interested in learning more, I would recommend taking a guided tour where Yeoman Warders (popularly known as ‘Beefeaters’) will “entertain you with tales of intrigue, imprisonment, execution, torture and much more.”  The ‘Beefeaters’, as they are nicknamed, have long been symbols of London and Britain.  Their nickname comes from their position in the Royal Bodyguard, where they could eat as much beef as they wanted from the king’s table.  Yeoman Warders are required to have served in the armed forces with an honorable record for at least 22 years and they are happy to answer your questions about the Tower or take a picture with you!

Have you visited the Tower of London? I would love to hear about your experience.

-Anisa

Expert Tips:

  • Take a guided tour of the Tower of London with a Beefeater.
  • Be sure to stop by and see Tower Bridge.
  • Honor those that have served in the military (not just on Armistice/Remembrance/Veteran’s Day).

 

The Tower of London and Remembrance Poppies
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